Type of housing predicts rate of readmission to hospital but not length of stay in people with schizophrenia on the Gold Coast in Queensland

Article


Browne, Graeme, Courtney, Mary and Meehan, Tom. 2004. "Type of housing predicts rate of readmission to hospital but not length of stay in people with schizophrenia on the Gold Coast in Queensland." Australian Health Review. 27 (1), pp. 65-72.
Article Title

Type of housing predicts rate of readmission to hospital but not length of stay in people with schizophrenia on the Gold Coast in Queensland

ERA Journal ID13431
Article CategoryArticle
AuthorsBrowne, Graeme (Author), Courtney, Mary (Author) and Meehan, Tom (Author)
Journal TitleAustralian Health Review
Journal Citation27 (1), pp. 65-72
Number of Pages8
Year2004
PublisherCSIRO Publishing
Place of PublicationAustralia
ISSN0156-5788
1449-8944
Abstract

Accommodation is considered to be important by institutions interested in mental health care both in Australia and internationally Some authorities assert that no component of a community mental health system is more important than decent affordable housing. Unfortunately there has been little research in Australia into the consequences of discharging people with a primary diagnosis of schizophrenia to different types of accommodation. This paper uses archival data to investigate the outcomes for people with schizophrenia discharged to two types of accommodation. The types of accommodation chosen are the persons own home and for-profit boarding house. These two were chosen because the literature suggests that they are respectively the most and least desirable types of accommodation. Results suggest that people with schizophrenia who were discharged to boarding houses are significantly more likely to be readmitted to the psychiatric unit of Gold Coast Hospital, although their length of stay in hospital is not significantly different.

Keywordsaccomodation; housing; schizophrenia; readmission; hospital
ANZSRC Field of Research 2020440603. Economic geography
440301. Family and household studies
420313. Mental health services
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Byline AffiliationsSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
Queensland University of Technology
Department of Health, Queensland
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