Bat fauna of a semi-arid environment in central western Queensland, Australia

Article


Young, R. A. and Ford, G. I.. 2000. "Bat fauna of a semi-arid environment in central western Queensland, Australia." Wildlife Research. 27 (2), pp. 203-215. https://doi.org/10.1071/WR98071
Article Title

Bat fauna of a semi-arid environment in central western Queensland, Australia

ERA Journal ID3020
Article CategoryArticle
AuthorsYoung, R. A. (Author) and Ford, G. I. (Author)
Journal TitleWildlife Research
Journal Citation27 (2), pp. 203-215
Number of Pages13
Year2000
PublisherCSIRO Publishing
Place of PublicationMelbourne, Australia
ISSN1035-3712
1448-5494
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1071/WR98071
Web Address (URL)http://www.publish.csiro.au/?act=view_file&file_id=WR98071.pdf
Abstract

The results from a survey of bats in semi-arid Idalia National Park, central western Queensland, are presented, with an analysis of habitat use, species richness, seasonal activity and reproductive patterns. Fourteen species were recorded: one megachiropteran, and thirteen microchiropterans in eight genera and three families.
Significant range extensions were recorded for Vespadelus vulturnus, V. finlaysoni and Nyctophilus gouldi. Capture success using harp traps was unusually high, with 859 bats of nine species captured in 27 trap-nights (31.4 bats per trap-night). Two species (Chalinolobus gouldii and Scotorepens greyii) comprised almost 75% of all captures in
harp traps. The remaining five species were recorded by means of echolocation call detection, cave searches and incidental observations. Bat species richness, abundance and capture success was greatest in riparian woodland and open forest adjacent to water; over 97% of captures in harp traps occurred at these sites. Breeding in most species
appears to follow a seasonally monoestrous pattern with the ovarian and spermatogenic cycles being asynchronous.
Sex ratios were close to parity but with a slightly higher proportion of females in some species in autumn. Females were generally larger and heavier than males.

Keywordspopulation survey; bats; central Australia; desert; community composition; habitat use; reproduction; semiarid region; species richness
ANZSRC Field of Research 2020310912. Comparative physiology
310402. Biogeography and phylogeography
310307. Population ecology
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Byline AffiliationsDepartment of Biological and Physical Sciences
Institution of OriginUniversity of Southern Queensland
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Morphometric differentiation of Vespadelus finlaysoni and V. troughtoni in Queensland
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