Crime shows and Islam: the modern and the medieval

Paper


Henderson, Lindsay. 2013. "Crime shows and Islam: the modern and the medieval." Mountfort, Paul (ed.) 4th Annual Popular Culture Association of Australia and New Zealand Conference (PopCAANZ 2013). Brisbane, Australia 24 - 26 Jun 2013 Auckland, New Zealand.
Paper/Presentation Title

Crime shows and Islam: the modern and the medieval

Presentation TypePaper
Authors
AuthorHenderson, Lindsay
EditorsMountfort, Paul
Journal or Proceedings TitleProceedings of the 4th Annual Conference of the Popular Culture Association of Australia and New Zealand (PopCAANZ 2013)
Year2013
Place of PublicationAuckland, New Zealand
ISBN9780646915616
Conference/Event4th Annual Popular Culture Association of Australia and New Zealand Conference (PopCAANZ 2013)
Event Details
4th Annual Popular Culture Association of Australia and New Zealand Conference (PopCAANZ 2013)
Event Date
24 to end of 26 Jun 2013
Event Location
Brisbane, Australia
Abstract

The medieval appears on our small screens in many guises, some more subtle than others. One of the more subtle medievalisms is evident in the very modern US crime shows: Criminal Minds, Numbers, NCIS: LA, Bones and Castle. All five shows use modern technology and innovative methods to solve serious crimes, and across their seasons, have addressed the issue of terrorism. Typically, the detectives of the shows catch the terrorists and prevent another serious attack on American soil, but in the process, they opt for a depiction of Islam that is surprisingly similar to the medieval depiction of Islam and the Muslims. In this version, Islam is portrayed as a religion of fanatics, prone to holy war, and devoted to attacking Western civilisation in the form of the USA. This crusading approach is matched by the detectives' Christian or Judaic affiliations, and whose own violent actions are justified by the need to protect the innocent. As in the medieval Crusades, the target of the attack - substituting the USA for Europe - has done nothing to deserve such violent attentions. There are, however, some serious problems with the popular continuation of this medievalist approach to Islam, the foremost being the unbalanced depiction of a global and largely peaceful religion, particularly as practiced by Muslims resident in Western countries. Greater awareness of the ideology carried by medievalist Islam
in these crime shows is an important part of grasping how the modern West understands this Abrahamic religion.

Keywordstelevision; crime shows; Muslim religion; terrorists; manipulation
ANZSRC Field of Research 2020500405. Religion, society and culture
520599. Social and personality psychology not elsewhere classified
470214. Screen and media culture
Public Notes

Author retains copyright.

Byline AffiliationsOpen Access College
Institution of OriginUniversity of Southern Queensland
Permalink -

https://research.usq.edu.au/item/q209y/crime-shows-and-islam-the-modern-and-the-medieval

Download files


Other Documentation
PopCAANZ2013.pdf
File access level: Anyone

  • 1922
    total views
  • 235
    total downloads
  • 0
    views this month
  • 1
    downloads this month

Export as

Related outputs

Vale ‘sister suffragette’: how Glynis Johns became a pop-culture icon in the story of votes for women
Stevenson, Ana and Helwig, Lindsay. 2024. "Vale ‘sister suffragette’: how Glynis Johns became a pop-culture icon in the story of votes for women." The Conversation.
Female Sleuths and Postfeminism in Modern American Crime Shows: Bones and Castle
Helwig, Lindsay. 2023. "Female Sleuths and Postfeminism in Modern American Crime Shows: Bones and Castle." Harmes, Marcus K., Harmes, Barbara and Harmes, Meredith A. (ed.) Watching the Cops: Essays on Police and Policing in 21st Century Film and Television. United States. McFarland & Company, Inc.. pp. 181-193
Exposing the dynamic nature and potential role of student attribution processes on English for academic purposes achievement in higher education
Chang, Heejin, Windsor, Angela and Helwig, Lindsay. 2017. "Exposing the dynamic nature and potential role of student attribution processes on English for academic purposes achievement in higher education." English in Australia. 52 (2), pp. 73-81.
Re-living First Year – the first weeks
Colclough, Gillian, Kimmins, Lindy, Harmes, Marcus and Henderson, Lindsay. 2011. "Re-living First Year – the first weeks." 14th Pacific Rim First Year in Higher Education Conference (FYHE 2011). Perth, Australia 29 Jun - 01 Jul 2011 Perth, Australia.
From certainty to searching: the impact of 1979 on Welsh identity
Henderson, Lindsay. 2012. "From certainty to searching: the impact of 1979 on Welsh identity." Harmes, Marcus K., Henderson, Lindsay, Harmes, Barbara and Antonio, Amy (ed.) The British World: Religion, Memory, Society, Culture (2012). Toowoomba, Australia 02 - 05 Jul 2012 Toowoomba, Australia.
Writing Wales: Welsh historians and the search for identity 1970-1997
Henderson, Lindsay. 2011. Writing Wales: Welsh historians and the search for identity 1970-1997. Saarbrucken, Germany. Lambert Academic Publishing.