Natural Hendra virus infection in flying-foxes - tissue tropism and risk factors

Article


Goldspink, Lauren, Edson, Daniel W., Vidgen, Miranda E., Bingham, John, Field, Hume E. and Smith, Craig S.. 2015. "Natural Hendra virus infection in flying-foxes - tissue tropism and risk factors." PLoS One. 10 (6), pp. 1-10. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0128835
Article Title

Natural Hendra virus infection in flying-foxes - tissue tropism and risk factors

ERA Journal ID39745
Article CategoryArticle
AuthorsGoldspink, Lauren (Author), Edson, Daniel W. (Author), Vidgen, Miranda E. (Author), Bingham, John (Author), Field, Hume E. (Author) and Smith, Craig S. (Author)
Journal TitlePLoS One
Journal Citation10 (6), pp. 1-10
Number of Pages10
Year2015
PublisherPublic Library of Science (PLoS)
Place of PublicationUnited States
ISSN1932-6203
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0128835
Web Address (URL)http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0128835
Abstract

Hendra virus (HeV) is a lethal zoonotic agent that emerged in 1994 in Australia. Pteropid bats (flying-foxes) are the natural reservoir. To date, HeV has spilled over from flying-foxes to horses on 51 known occasions, and from infected horses to close-contact humans on seven occasions. We undertook screening of archived bat tissues for HeV by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Tissues were tested from 310 bats including 295 Pteropodiformes and 15 Vespertilioniformes. HeV was detected in 20 individual flying-foxes (6.4%) from various tissues including spleen, kidney, liver, lung, placenta and blood components. Detection was significantly higher in Pteropus Alecto and P. conspicillatus, identifying species as a risk factor for infection. Further, our findings indicate that HeV has a predilection for the spleen, suggesting this organ plays an important role in HeV infection. The lack of detections in the foetal tissues of HeV-positive females suggests that vertical transmission is not a regular mode of transmission in naturally infected flyingfoxes, and that placental and foetal tissues are not a major source of infection for horses. A better understanding of HeV tissue tropism will strengthen management of the risk of spillover from flying-foxes to horses and ultimately humans.

Keywordsspleen; respiratory infection; kidney; horses; pregnancy; viral replication; Polymerase chain reaction; urine
ANZSRC Field of Research 2020300904. Veterinary diagnosis and diagnostics
300905. Veterinary epidemiology
300914. Veterinary virology
Byline AffiliationsDepartment of Agriculture and Fisheries, Queensland
Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Australia
Institution of OriginUniversity of Southern Queensland
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