Can charter cities 'anabolise' the Australian Federation?

Article


Gussen, Benjamen F.. 2017. "Can charter cities 'anabolise' the Australian Federation?" Public Administration and Policy: a Hong Kong and Asia-Pacific journal. 20 (1), pp. 18-38.
Article Title

Can charter cities 'anabolise' the Australian Federation?

ERA Journal ID42006
Article CategoryArticle
Authors
AuthorGussen, Benjamen F.
Journal TitlePublic Administration and Policy: a Hong Kong and Asia-Pacific journal
Journal Citation20 (1), pp. 18-38
Number of Pages21
Year2017
Place of PublicationHong Kong
ISSN1022-0275
Web Address (URL)http://journal.hkpaa.org.hk/
Abstract

This paper explores a new form of governance for Australia-the 'charter city.' Should Australia have cities that are governed independently? Can such
cities 'anabolise' the development of the nation as a whole? The Commonwealth is largely a network of cities that power our political, social and economic systems. Reforming this federalism might not only necessitate
creating more 'Alpha,' or world-class cities but also affording these cities a wider (asymmetrical) margin of autonomy. City governance structures and their relationship to higher order political entities are context driven. Today's administrative structures - formed in the 19th century - are not responsive to
global dynamics. More agile structures may be needed to take full advantage of globalization. Bringing about such change may be more pragmatic than proposals relying on the vagaries of constitutional amendments.

Keywordscharter cities, city-regions, federalism, global cities, nation-states, subsidiarity
ANZSRC Field of Research 2020389999. Other economics not elsewhere classified
480702. Constitutional law
489999. Other law and legal studies not elsewhere classified
480410. Legal theory, jurisprudence and legal interpretation
389903. Heterodox economics
Public Notes

Copyright © 2017. Hong Kong Public Administration Association.

Byline AffiliationsSchool of Law and Justice
Institution of OriginUniversity of Southern Queensland
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