Banking on Banjo: business, bias, and belonging in rural social imaginaries

Article


Wallis, Rachael. 2019. "Banking on Banjo: business, bias, and belonging in rural social imaginaries." Rural Society: the journal of research into rural and regional social issues in Australia. 28 (1), pp. 72-87. https://doi.org/10.1080/10371656.2019.1575558
Article Title

Banking on Banjo: business, bias, and belonging in rural social imaginaries

ERA Journal ID22045
Article CategoryArticle
Authors
AuthorWallis, Rachael
Journal TitleRural Society: the journal of research into rural and regional social issues in Australia
Journal Citation28 (1), pp. 72-87
Number of Pages16
Year2019
PublisherRoutledge
Place of PublicationUnited Kingdom
ISSN1037-1656
2204-0536
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1080/10371656.2019.1575558
Web Address (URL)https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10371656.2019.1575558
Abstract

Social imaginaries, like those in the work of A. B. “Banjo” Paterson and Henry Lawson, reinforced by contemporary ideas of a bucolic rural idyll, reflect images of Australia shared in contemporary media. These images are often used in marketing rural places. This research examines the social imaginaries used to create marketing for a wide-ranging area around Stanthorpe, Queensland. These marketing ideas promote stereotypes of Australia’s rural areas as rugged, adventurous places filled with “authentic” people and experiences. Promotion of these autochthonous social imaginaries, however, brings with it challenges, including the exclusion of those who don’t fit normative ideas of a predominantly white, male, heterosexual society. This research uses proximity ethics to challenge the notion of using the past to sell the present and contributes to ideas about current rural discourse. Findings may be used to raise awareness within rural Australia about the exclusionary nature of these social imaginaries.

Keywordsautochthony, discourse, rural idyll, proximity ethics
ANZSRC Field of Research 2020470299. Cultural studies not elsewhere classified
470208. Culture, representation and identity
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Byline AffiliationsSchool of Arts and Communication
Institution of OriginUniversity of Southern Queensland
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