PreEMPT (Preterm infant Early intervention for Movement and Participation Trial): Feasibility outcomes of a randomised controlled trial

Article


Mobbs, C., Spittle, A. and Johnston, L.. 2022. "PreEMPT (Preterm infant Early intervention for Movement and Participation Trial): Feasibility outcomes of a randomised controlled trial." Early Human Development. 166. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2022.105551
Article Title

PreEMPT (Preterm infant Early intervention for Movement and Participation Trial): Feasibility outcomes of a randomised controlled trial

ERA Journal ID16043
Article CategoryArticle
AuthorsMobbs, C., Spittle, A. and Johnston, L.
Journal TitleEarly Human Development
Journal Citation166
Article Number105551
Number of Pages18
Year2022
PublisherElsevier
Place of PublicationIreland
ISSN0378-3782
1872-6232
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2022.105551
Web Address (URL)https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0378378222000147
Abstract

Purpose
Investigate feasibility of PreEMPT: a novel participation-focused, early physiotherapy intervention for preterm infants in regional Australia.

Materials and methods
Participants were infants born <35 weeks, residing in regional Australia. Sixteen infants were recruited then randomised to usual physiotherapy care (UPC: n = 8) or PreEMPT (n = 8). PreEMPT involved 14-weeks of alternating clinic- or telehealth-based, participation-focused intervention. Feasibility was evaluated by: demand, practicality, acceptability, implementation and limited efficacy testing for infants (motor, participation) and parents (mental well-being, self-efficacy).

Results
Demand was lower than expected (45% recruitment rate). For practicality, attrition was high in the PreEMPT group (mean assessment attendance 3.8/5 sessions, range 2–5) compared to UPC (4.8/5 sessions, range 4–5). In addition, mean PreEMPT treatment dose received was approximately half intended (overall: 7.3/14 sessions, range 0–12; equivalent for face-to-face: 3.9/7, range 0–6, versus telehealth 3.4/7, range 0–6). The most common reason cited for treatment non-attendance was maternal mental health (22 sessions). Treatment acceptability for parents was high, with PreEMPT parents reporting they were offered choices in sessions (p = .02), and increased their knowledge (p = .01) and confidence (p = .009). There was a large effect size in favour of PreEMPT for increased parental self-efficacy (p = .021, ES = 1.34).

Conclusion
Early post-discharge physiotherapy for preterm infants in regional Australia is beneficial according to families but logistically challenging.

KeywordsParticipation; Preterm infants ; Early intervention
ANZSRC Field of Research 2020321302. Infant and child health
420106. Physiotherapy
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Byline AffiliationsUniversity of Queensland
Department of Health, Queensland
University of Melbourne
Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Victoria
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Mobbs, Chelsea A., Spittle, Alicia and Johnston, Leanne M.. 2021. "Participation measures for infants and toddlers aged birth to 23 months: A systematic review." Physical and Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics. 41 (6), pp. 567-589. https://doi.org/10.1080/01942638.2021.1900488
PreEMPT (Preterm infant Early intervention for Movement and Participation Trial): The feasibility of a Novel, Participation-focused Early Physiotherapy intervention supported by Telehealth in Regional Australia - A Protocol
Mobbs, Chelsea, Spittle, Alicia and Johnston, Leanne. 2020. "PreEMPT (Preterm infant Early intervention for Movement and Participation Trial): The feasibility of a Novel, Participation-focused Early Physiotherapy intervention supported by Telehealth in Regional Australia - A Protocol." Open Journal of Pediatrics. 10, pp. 707-731. https://doi.org/10.4236/ojped.2020.104073.