Building capacity for climate adaptation planning in protected area management: Options and challenges for World Heritage

Article


Melbourne-Thomas, Jess, Lin, Brenda B., Hopkins, Mandy, Hill, Rosemary, Dunlop, Michael, Macgregor, Nicholas, Merson, Samuel D., Vertigan, Caitlin, Donegan, Luke, Sheppard, Marian, Meyers, Jacqui, Thomas, Linda, Visschers, Lola, McNeair, Bianca, Syme, Lance, Grant, Chrissy, Pedrocchi, Nicholas, Oakley, Patricia, Stevens, Amy, ..., Ireland, Tracy. 2024. "Building capacity for climate adaptation planning in protected area management: Options and challenges for World Heritage." Biological Conservation. 290. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2024.110459
Article Title

Building capacity for climate adaptation planning in protected area management: Options and challenges for World Heritage

ERA Journal ID3211
Article CategoryArticle
AuthorsMelbourne-Thomas, Jess, Lin, Brenda B., Hopkins, Mandy, Hill, Rosemary, Dunlop, Michael, Macgregor, Nicholas, Merson, Samuel D., Vertigan, Caitlin, Donegan, Luke, Sheppard, Marian, Meyers, Jacqui, Thomas, Linda, Visschers, Lola, McNeair, Bianca, Syme, Lance, Grant, Chrissy, Pedrocchi, Nicholas, Oakley, Patricia, Stevens, Amy, Rose, Denis, Rose, Erin, Gould, Jade, Locke, John, Maybanks, Lynda and Ireland, Tracy
Journal TitleBiological Conservation
Journal Citation290
Article Number110459
Number of Pages11
Year2024
PublisherElsevier
Place of PublicationNetherlands
ISSN0006-3207
1873-2917
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2024.110459
Web Address (URL)https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S000632072400020X
AbstractResponse and adaptation to the impacts of climate change is a vital and increasing requirement for protected area management. On the ground managers of cultural and natural values in protected places have requested practical guidance on how to undertake climate change impact analysis, vulnerability assessment, and adaptation planning together with enhanced capacity for planning with partners, rightsholders and stakeholders. In this paper we explore how co-development and subsequent testing among World Heritage site managers, Indigenous experts and researchers, produced guidance for assessing, responding to and planning for the impacts of climate change on the diverse values of World Heritage sites in Australia. We draw on the diversity of cultural and natural heritage values associated with the terrestrial, coastal and marine environments in Australian World Heritage sites, and the broad range of institutional contexts in these sites, to highlight considerations of relevance to other protected areas (including other World Heritage sites around the world, Ramsar wetlands and marine protected areas). Our paper highlights that, for climate adaptation planning to become a normal part of management, there is a need for ongoing capacity building, including around the use of climate information to inform adaptation planning and implementation, as well as integrating Indigenous perspectives. Building capacity may involve trial and error, negotiation, sharing, sourcing and interpreting new information, and changes in expectations. It will require novel and more dynamic relationships between partners and stakeholders. Managers should include capacity building for climate adaptation planning and implementation as a specific climate adaptation task in their planning.
KeywordsAdaptation; Indigenous; Protected areas ; Ramsar; World Heritage ; Climate change ; Vulnerability; Cultural heritage ; Natural heritage ; Outstanding Universal Value
Contains Sensitive ContentDoes not contain sensitive content
ANZSRC Field of Research 20204101. Climate change impacts and adaptation
Public NotesFiles associated with this item cannot be displayed due to copyright restrictions.
Byline AffiliationsCommonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Australia
University of Tasmania
Centre for Applied Climate Sciences
James Cook University
Parks Australia, Australian Capital Territory
University of Kent, United Kingdom
Port Arthur Historic Site Management Authority, Australia
Fremantle Prison, Australia
University of East Anglia, United Kingdom
Australian Institute of Marine Science, Australia
Kayandel Archaeological Services, Australia
University of the Sunshine Coast
Gathaagudu (Shark Bay), Australia
Murujuga Aboriginal Corporation, Australia
Gunditj Mirring Traditional Owners Aboriginal Corporation, Australia
BioCultural Consulting, Australia
Wirrinyah First Nations Conservation Services, Australia
University of Canberra
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