The dos and don’ts of mentoring: why mentoring works for women

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Mason, Gay, Dorman, Marilyn and Dearden, Rhyl. 2007. "The dos and don’ts of mentoring: why mentoring works for women." Albion, Majella J. and Collins, Pauline (ed.) 2007 International Women's Conference: Education, Employment and Everything... theTriple Layers of a Woman's Life. Toowoomba, Australia 26 - 29 Sep 2007 Toowoomba, Australia.
Paper/Presentation Title

The dos and don’ts of mentoring: why mentoring works for women

Presentation TypeOther
AuthorsMason, Gay (Author), Dorman, Marilyn (Author) and Dearden, Rhyl (Author)
EditorsAlbion, Majella J. and Collins, Pauline
Journal or Proceedings TitleRefereed Proceedings of the 2007 International Women’s Conference: Education, Employment and Everything... the Triple Layers of a Woman's Life
Year2007
Place of PublicationToowoomba, Australia
ISBN9781921420009
Conference/Event2007 International Women's Conference: Education, Employment and Everything... theTriple Layers of a Woman's Life
Event Details
2007 International Women's Conference: Education, Employment and Everything... theTriple Layers of a Woman's Life
Event Date
26 to end of 29 Sep 2007
Event Location
Toowoomba, Australia
Abstract

Mentoring is the process of having a significant beneficial effect on the life or career of another individual, generally as a result of personal one-on-one contact. A mentor is one who offers knowledge, insight, perspective or wisdom that is especially useful to the other person.
Traditionally mentoring has been used to assist promising junior executives climb the career ladder. It usually involved a more skilled senior person sponsoring and encouraging the protégée. Very often this happened through informal networks. Recently the concept of mentoring has
taken on a new dimension focused more specifically on career direction, goal setting, role models, mentee visibility, networking, support systems, and a revitalisation of self and career. Current practice has also found peer mentoring to be highly effective and while it is important that the mentor should be experienced and be able to pass on the wisdom of that experience to the
protégée, it is not always necessary for the mentor to be at a very senior level within an organization. Recent practice is also finding that both parties to the mentor process benefit. In the past it was assumed that mentoring was a oneway process in which only mentees gained. In fact, mentors report that their participation in mentor schemes has given them a fresh perspective on their own lives and careers.
Drawing heavily from experiences at the University of Southern Queensland, this interactive workshop will throw new light on the ways in which women are changing the
traditional ideas and practice of mentoring. To facilitate the process of identifying career directions and pathways, mind mapping will be used to help participants to record their own profiles, and with input on careers counselling, to identify the best matches between mentors and mentees.

Keywordscareer mentoring; interpersonal communication; counselling
ANZSRC Field of Research 2020390203. Sociology of education
520502. Gender psychology
390404. Educational counselling
Public Notes

This is a workshop presentation. Copyright is retained by the authors. This work is copyright. Apart from any use as permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, no part may be reproduced by any means without written permission of the copyright holders.

Byline AffiliationsPro Vice-Chancellor's Office (Social Justice)
Learning and Teaching Support Unit
Department of Psychology
University of Southern Queensland
Institution of OriginUniversity of Southern Queensland
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