Designing for diversity: a case study exploring implications of ecological psychology for inclusion

Article


Finn, Roxanne. 2013. "Designing for diversity: a case study exploring implications of ecological psychology for inclusion." International Journal of Learner Diversity and Identities. 19 (2), pp. 45-58. https://doi.org/10.18848/2327-0128/cgp/v19i02/48531
Article Title

Designing for diversity: a case study exploring implications of ecological psychology for inclusion

ERA Journal ID200042
Article CategoryArticle
Authors
AuthorFinn, Roxanne
Journal TitleInternational Journal of Learner Diversity and Identities
Journal Citation19 (2), pp. 45-58
Number of Pages14
Year2013
Place of PublicationChampaign, IL. United States
ISSN2327-0128
2327-2627
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.18848/2327-0128/cgp/v19i02/48531
Web Address (URL)https://cgscholar.com/bookstore/works/designing-for-diversity
Abstract

The dominant psychological paradigm which underpins institutionalised learning has perpetuated a deficit rationality whereby children outside of normative developmental ranges are understood to be needy of catch-up or compensatory programs. This perennial approach magnifies and perpetuates difference, seemingly rendering the concept of inclusion in school contexts fallacious. This case study will exemplify an alternative way for schools to nurture and implicitly include young people and their families in a community of practice (Lave & Wenger, 1991). The Studio Learning Project (SLP) was established to create an additional space for learning which allows children the freedom to engage in self-instigated or negotiated projects. Reconceptualising learning from an ecological perspective, as a transaction between actors and their environments, the study supports giving increased consideration to learning as an individual-environment transaction (Barab & Roth, 2006). This places the management of resources and design of learning spaces at the forefront of decision-making for schools and their communities concerned with inclusive education. Kalantzis and Cope (2008) have claimed that designing for learning is the new work of teaching. Ecological psychology describes effectivities and affordance networks (Barab & Roth, 2006; Barab & Plucker, 2002) which transcend the individualistic focus of the dominant theoretical paradigm affecting schools, and suggest the environment and its physical, temporal, and social resources are cause for exploration when it comes to inclusive education.

Keywordsalternative education; ecological psychology; inclusive education; learning environments; parent and community engagement in schools; personalising learning; student-centred learning; transformative learning
ANZSRC Field of Research 2020520102. Educational psychology
390409. Learning sciences
390411. Special education and disability
Public Notes

© 2013 (individual papers), the author. Apart from fair dealing for the purposes of study, research, criticism or review as permitted under the applicable copyright legislation, no part of this work may be reproduced by any process without written permission from the publisher.

Byline AffiliationsFaculty of Education
Institution of OriginUniversity of Southern Queensland
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Related outputs

Opening up your classroom to a community of conversations
Finn, Roxanne. 2015. "Opening up your classroom to a community of conversations." Practically Primary. 20 (1), pp. 7-9.
The affordances of place: implications of ecological psychology for inclusive education
Finn, Roxanne. 2015. The affordances of place: implications of ecological psychology for inclusive education. PhD Thesis Doctor of Philosophy. University of Southern Queensland.