Estimating sea level rise around Australia using a new approach to account for low frequency climate signals

Article


Agha Karimi, Armin and Deng, Xiaoli. 2020. "Estimating sea level rise around Australia using a new approach to account for low frequency climate signals." Advances in Space Research. 65 (10), pp. 2324-2338. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.asr.2020.02.002
Article Title

Estimating sea level rise around Australia using a new approach to account for low frequency climate signals

ERA Journal ID1950
Article CategoryArticle
AuthorsAgha Karimi, Armin (Author) and Deng, Xiaoli (Author)
Journal TitleAdvances in Space Research
Journal Citation65 (10), pp. 2324-2338
Number of Pages15
Year2020
Place of PublicationUnited Kingdom
ISSN0273-1177
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1016/j.asr.2020.02.002
Web Address (URL)https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0273117720300788
Abstract

Regional sea level studies help to identify the vulnerable areas to the sea level rise. This study investigates the impact of climate modes on sea level variations and trends around Australia using altimetry data, climate indices, and sea level records from tide gauge stations. Here, we show that the sea level variations are negatively correlated with climate indices to the north and west of Australia. The spectral analyses of the climate indices and tide gauge data suggest that a low frequency signal with a period of 11 years emerges during the mid 1980s. Since the 25-year length of the satellite altimetry record is yet too short to detect low frequency signals, their effect on the estimation of regional sea level trend is unknown. Therefore, we estimate the sea level trend with consideration of this signal and using a two-step method. All signals with periods shorter than 7.5 years are first removed from sea level time series and then the trend is estimated using the parametric model that includes the 11-year signal. The skill of the parametric model in explaining the variations in sea level anomaly validates the presence of the 11-year signal detected in the spectrograms of the tide gauge data and climate indices. The average sea level trend for the study area is estimated as 3.85 ± 0.15 mm/year.

KeywordsSatellite altimetry, Climate indices, Regional sea level variation, Tide gauge, Spectral analysis
ANZSRC Field of Research 2020401304. Photogrammetry and remote sensing
370803. Physical oceanography
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Byline AffiliationsUniversity of Newcastle
Institution of OriginUniversity of Southern Queensland
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