The Relationship Between Climate Change Issue Engagement, Connection to Nature and Mental Wellbeing

Article


Whelan, Matt, Rahimi-Golkhandan, Shahin and Brymer, Eric. 2022. "The Relationship Between Climate Change Issue Engagement, Connection to Nature and Mental Wellbeing." Frontiers in Public Health. 10. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpubh.2022.790578
Article Title

The Relationship Between Climate Change Issue Engagement, Connection to Nature and Mental Wellbeing

ERA Journal ID200526
Article CategoryArticle
AuthorsWhelan, Matt, Rahimi-Golkhandan, Shahin and Brymer, Eric
Journal TitleFrontiers in Public Health
Journal Citation10
Article Number790578
Number of Pages9
Year2022
PublisherFrontiers Media SA
Place of PublicationSwitzerland
ISSN2296-2565
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.3389/fpubh.2022.790578
Web Address (URL)https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpubh.2022.790578/full
Abstract

As the threat of climate change becomes increasingly prevalent for people in both the developed and developing world, the impact of climate change on mental wellbeing has become a crucial area of research. In addition to the direct, indirect, and psychosocial impacts of climate change on mental wellbeing, there is also a question of how climate change driven changes to the environment will influence the well-established positive relationship between connection to nature and mental wellbeing. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between climate change issue engagement, connection to nature, and mental wellbeing in English speaking adults over 18 years of age. This study examined the average levels of connection to nature and mental wellbeing in people with different levels of climate change issue engagement, and evaluated whether a person's level of climate change issue engagement uniquely predicted mental wellbeing. The study corroborated positive relationships between wellbeing and various aspects of relatedness to nature in the overall sample. The strength of these relationships, however, depended on the level of climate change issue engagement. More specifically, the level of engagement is inversely linked to mental wellbeing, such that the lower the level of engagement, generally the higher is wellbeing.

Keywordsclimate change; wellbeing; nature relatedness; pro-environmental behavior; nature connection/intimacy
Byline AffiliationsSchool of Psychology and Wellbeing
Southern Cross University
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https://research.usq.edu.au/item/z02y5/the-relationship-between-climate-change-issue-engagement-connection-to-nature-and-mental-wellbeing

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