Robotic surgery education in Australia and New Zealand: primetime for a curriculum

Article


Harrison, William, Munien, Kale and Desai, Devang. 2024. "Robotic surgery education in Australia and New Zealand: primetime for a curriculum." ANZ Journal of Surgery. 94 (1-2), pp. 30-36. https://doi.org/10.1111/ans.18843
Article Title

Robotic surgery education in Australia and New Zealand: primetime for a curriculum

ERA Journal ID15704
Article CategoryArticle
AuthorsHarrison, William, Munien, Kale and Desai, Devang
Journal TitleANZ Journal of Surgery
Journal Citation94 (1-2), pp. 30-36
Number of Pages7
Year2024
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons
Place of PublicationAustralia
ISSN1445-1433
1445-2197
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1111/ans.18843
Web Address (URL)https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ans.18843
Abstract

Background
Globally, robotic surgery (RS) has witnessed remarkable growth, yet Australia and New Zealand (ANZ) lack dedicated RS training programs, creating a workforce gap. This narrative review synthesises international research to explore trends and challenges in robotic education.

Methods
We conducted a comprehensive literature review, searching PubMed, Google Scholar, and MEDLINE using keywords like ‘robotic surgery’, ‘surgical education’, ‘robotic surgery training’, and ‘robotic surgery curriculum’. We selected studies contributing to understanding current curricula, training tools, and issues in robotic education, utilising the international experience and how it might apply to the ANZ context.

Results
RS in ANZ has grown significantly over two decades, but formal curricula for trainees are absent. North America and Europe employ diverse training tools and curricula. Barriers include cost, access, time constraints, equipment complexity, changing training environments, and competition from emerging robotic surgical systems. Balancing the curriculum's demands with trainees' existing requirements is essential.

Conclusion
Developing a tailored RS curriculum within ANZ's surgical training is crucial for RS to become the primary surgical approach in the future. By working towards a national curriculum we can prepare skilled trainees in robotics to meet the rising demand. The most significant barrier is the lack of robotics in public hospital where trainees are based. This curriculum should encompass online teaching modules, bedside assistance, surgical simulation, dual console mentoring, and primary operator experience.

Keywordscurriculum; education; health workforce; robot surgery; training programs
ANZSRC Field of Research 20204299. Other health sciences
Public NotesFiles associated with this item cannot be displayed due to copyright restrictions.
Byline AffiliationsToowoomba Hospital, Australia
St Vincent's Private Hospital, Toowoomba, Australia
University of Queensland
Griffith University
University of Southern Queensland
St Andrew's Toowoomba Hospital, Australia
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