Little boys: tomorrow's macho lads

Article


Keddie, Amanda. 2003. "Little boys: tomorrow's macho lads." Discourse: studies in the cultural politics of education. 24 (3), pp. 289-306. https://doi.org/10.1080/0159630032000172498
Article Title

Little boys: tomorrow's macho lads

ERA Journal ID34674
Article CategoryArticle
Authors
AuthorKeddie, Amanda
Journal TitleDiscourse: studies in the cultural politics of education
Journal Citation24 (3), pp. 289-306
Number of Pages18
Year2003
PublisherTaylor & Francis
Place of PublicationOxford, UK
ISSN0159-6306
1469-3739
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1080/0159630032000172498
Abstract

This paper presents elements of an ethnographic case study of a group of five male friends between the ages of six and eight years. The study sought to examine the ways in which the group's social dynamics interacted to define, regulate and maintain collective understandings of masculinity.

Dominant peer culture was found to be particularly potent in championing a hegemonic masculinity embodying and
cultivating physical domination, aggression and violence underpinned by constructions of females and femininity as the negative 'other'. These restrictive understandings were interpreted as normalised through the philosophies and practices of the boys' teachers and their principal. Here the naturalist assumptions underpinning dominant early childhood pedagogy constituted the boys as 'gender innocent' and were implicated in understandings of developmentally appropriate practice. Through illuminating clear parallels to associated research, this paper presents further warrant for abandoning these naturalist assumptions which continue to mitigate against gender equity in early childhood (MacNaughton, Rethinking Gender in Early Childhood Education, St Leonards, Allen & Unwin, 2000). In this regard, the paper signifies the importance of maintaining a focus on addressing issues of collective masculinity in early childhood.

Keywordsmasculinity, gender roles, gender construction, early childhood, peer relationships
ANZSRC Field of Research 2020390304. Primary education
390406. Gender, sexuality and education
Byline AffiliationsFaculty of Education
Permalink -

https://research.usq.edu.au/item/9z20w/little-boys-tomorrow-s-macho-lads

  • 1869
    total views
  • 6
    total downloads
  • 3
    views this month
  • 0
    downloads this month

Export as

Related outputs

Working with boys’ peer cultures: productive pedagogies... productive boys
Keddie, Amanda. 2004. "Working with boys’ peer cultures: productive pedagogies... productive boys." Curriculum Perspectives. 24 (1), pp. 20-29.
Research with young children: the use of an affinity group approach to explore the social dynamics of peer culture
Keddie, Amanda. 2004. "Research with young children: the use of an affinity group approach to explore the social dynamics of peer culture." British Journal of Sociology of Education. 25 (1), pp. 35-51. https://doi.org/10.1080/0142569032000155926
Power, control and authority: issues at the centre of boys' relationships with their teachers
Keddie, Amanda and Churchill, Rick. 2003. "Power, control and authority: issues at the centre of boys' relationships with their teachers." Queensland Journal of Educational Research. 19 (1), pp. 13-27.
Peer groups, power and pedagogy: the limits of an educational paradigm of separation
Keddie, Amanda and Hickey, Christopher. 2004. "Peer groups, power and pedagogy: the limits of an educational paradigm of separation." The Australian Educational Researcher. 31 (1), pp. 57-78.
Control and constraint: issues of concern for boys in the middle years of schooling
Keddie, Amanda and Churchill, Rick. 2003. "Control and constraint: issues of concern for boys in the middle years of schooling." Primary and Middle Years Educator. 1 (3), pp. 3-10.
Teacher-student relationships
Keddie, Amanda and Churchill, Rick. 2005. "Teacher-student relationships ." Pendergast, Donna and Bahr, Nan (ed.) Teaching middle years: rethinking curriculum, pedagogy and assessment. Crows Nest, NSW. Allen & Unwin. pp. 211-225