The future of higher education in the knowledge-based economy: developing innovative approaches to integrated articulation and credit transfer in Australia

Paper


Byrnes, Jill, Paez, Dianne, Blacker, Jillian, Jackson, Angela and Dwyer, Cathy. 2010. "The future of higher education in the knowledge-based economy: developing innovative approaches to integrated articulation and credit transfer in Australia." Klucznik-Toro, Agieszka, Bodis, Krisztina and Kiss Pal, Istvan (ed.) International Higher Education Partnerships and Innovation (IHEPI) Conference: From Higher Education to Innovation: Management and Entrepreneurship in a Changing Market (2010). Budapest, Hungary 06 - 08 Sep 2010 Budapest, Hungary.
Paper/Presentation Title

The future of higher education in the knowledge-based economy: developing innovative approaches to integrated articulation and credit transfer in Australia

Presentation TypePaper
AuthorsByrnes, Jill (Author), Paez, Dianne (Author), Blacker, Jillian (Author), Jackson, Angela (Author) and Dwyer, Cathy (Author)
EditorsKlucznik-Toro, Agieszka, Bodis, Krisztina and Kiss Pal, Istvan
Journal or Proceedings TitleProceedings of the International Higher Education Partnerships and Innovation (IHEPI) Conference Budapest: From Higher Education to Innovation: Management and Entrepreneurship in a Changing Market
Number of Pages11
Year2010
Place of PublicationBudapest, Hungary
ISBN9786155001154
Web Address (URL) of Paperhttp://www.ihepi.net
Conference/EventInternational Higher Education Partnerships and Innovation (IHEPI) Conference: From Higher Education to Innovation: Management and Entrepreneurship in a Changing Market (2010)
Event Details
International Higher Education Partnerships and Innovation (IHEPI) Conference: From Higher Education to Innovation: Management and Entrepreneurship in a Changing Market (2010)
Event Date
06 to end of 08 Sep 2010
Event Location
Budapest, Hungary
Abstract

The Integrated Articulation and Credit Transfer project (IACT) is an action research project which is developing innovative strategies and models which may overcome
the barriers to articulation pathways, partnerships and agreements between the education and training sectors in Australia. The project seeks to improve the level of
industry input into articulation pathway development, and to improve the levels of transferability and sustainability of articulation models and pathways between stakeholders. Ultimately, the project seeks to make articulation pathways easier to establish for stakeholders and more seamless for students.
A key area of the connectivity essential to the success of an articulation pathway that is given little attention in the articulation pathway debate is the role of industry and
the potential for an articulation pathway to meet, at least to some degree, the workforce requirements and skills shortages of the industry. The IACT project is exploring not only the level of connectivity that currently exists between industry and the education and training sectors for the purpose of the development of articulation and credit transfer pathways, but also how industry determines its role.
An 'industry-determined' articulation pathway model involves consulting with industry to gather their views on what articulation pathway model/s would assist
their industry in meeting their current and anticipated workforce requirements, before consulting with education and training providers. Once the workforce
requirements of the industry have been firmly established, interested education and training providers develop solutions to meet this industry need. The research is
investigating what factors and processes are crucial to the development of 'industry determined' pathway models. It is also testing whether these factors can be used as a
model of engagement between industry, Vocational Education and Training (VET) and Higher Education (HE) leading to the development of articulation pathways that can be duplicated by these three sectors in a range of industry areas. The study is significant because, in this model, industry is not only participating in the process as an equal partner but, for the first time, is in a prominent negotiating role from the outset of the articulation pathway development journey.

Keywordsarticulation; education and training sectors; partnerships
ANZSRC Field of Research 2020390403. Educational administration, management and leadership
Byline AffiliationsPro Vice-Chancellor's Office (Partnerships)
Department of Education, Training and the Arts, Queensland
Institution of OriginUniversity of Southern Queensland
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