Primary physical education specialists and their perceived role in the explicit/implicit delivery of health education

Article


Chong, Melisa, McCuaig, Louise and Rossi, Tony. 2018. "Primary physical education specialists and their perceived role in the explicit/implicit delivery of health education." Curriculum Studies in Health and Physical Education. 9 (2), pp. 189-204. https://doi.org/10.1080/25742981.2018.1452163
Article Title

Primary physical education specialists and their perceived role in the explicit/implicit delivery of health education

Article CategoryArticle
AuthorsChong, Melisa (Author), McCuaig, Louise (Author) and Rossi, Tony (Author)
Journal TitleCurriculum Studies in Health and Physical Education
Journal Citation9 (2), pp. 189-204
Number of Pages16
Year2018
Place of PublicationAustralia
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1080/25742981.2018.1452163
Web Address (URL)https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/25742981.2018.1452163
Abstract

Children’s health and wellbeing are crucial to a prosperous Australia and are at the centre of health-related policy-making. Schools are considered as ideal sites to promote health and wellbeing and thus some of the responsibility of children’s health and wellbeing has been assumed by schools beyond the obligations of the health and physical education curriculum. Notwithstanding the importance attached to schooling as a key mechanism for enhancing and maintaining positive health and wellbeing, there is little research exploring the extent to which primary physical education (PE) specialists (such as in Queensland) currently undertake health work. This paper is to provide an insight into the health work currently undertaken by Queensland primary school PE specialists. Utilising a grounded theory approach, this study examines PE specialists’ roles as health workers and their engagement in the explicit/implicit delivery of health education in primary schools. The study adds to the evidence of the public health role played by PE teachers beyond simple motor skill development and exercise. Four categories of health work were identified from the data, these are: curriculum work, curriculum related work, policy work, and health related caring teaching. This research was undertaken as part of a higher degree by research program.

Keywordshealth and physical education, health education, grounded theory, primary physical education specialist
Contains Sensitive ContentDoes not contain sensitive content
ANZSRC Field of Research 2020390111. Physical education and development curriculum and pedagogy
390304. Primary education
Public Notes

File reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher/author.

Byline AffiliationsSchool of Linguistics, Adult and Specialist Education
University of Queensland
Western Sydney University
Institution of OriginUniversity of Southern Queensland
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