Does DNA evidence in the form of a likelihood ratio affect perceivers’ sensitivity to the strength of a suspect’s alibi?

Article


Ribeiro, Gianni, Tangen, Jason and McKimmie, Blake. 2020. "Does DNA evidence in the form of a likelihood ratio affect perceivers’ sensitivity to the strength of a suspect’s alibi? " Psychonomic Bulletin and Review. 27 (6), pp. 1325-1332. https://doi.org/10.3758/s13423-020-01784-x
Article Title

Does DNA evidence in the form of a likelihood ratio affect perceivers’ sensitivity to the strength of a suspect’s alibi?

ERA Journal ID6623
Article CategoryArticle
AuthorsRibeiro, Gianni, Tangen, Jason and McKimmie, Blake
Journal TitlePsychonomic Bulletin and Review
Journal Citation27 (6), pp. 1325-1332
Number of Pages8
Year2020
PublisherSpringer
Place of PublicationUnited States
ISSN1069-9384
1531-5320
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.3758/s13423-020-01784-x
Web Address (URL)https://link.springer.com/article/10.3758/s13423-020-01784-x
Abstract

Forensic expert testimony is beginning to reflect the uncertain nature of forensic science. Many academics and forensic practitioners suggest that forensic disciplines ought to adopt a likelihood ratio approach, but this approach fails to communicate the possibility of false positive errors, such as contamination or mislabeling of samples. In two preregistered experiments (N1 = 591, N2 = 584), we investigated whether participants would be convinced by a strong DNA likelihood ratio (5,500 in Experiment 1 and 5,500,000 in Experiment 2) in the presence of varying alibi strengths. Those who received a likelihood ratio often concluded that the suspect was the source of the DNA evidence and guilty of the crime compared with those who did not receive a likelihood ratio—but they also tended to conclude that an error may have occurred during DNA analysis. Furthermore, as the strength of the suspect’s alibi increased, people were less likely to regard the suspect as the source of the evidence or guilty of the crime, and were more likely to conclude that an error may have occurred during DNA analysis. However, people who received a likelihood ratio were actually more sensitive to the strength of the suspect’s alibi than those who did not, driven largely by the low ratings in the strongest alibi. Interestingly, the same pattern of results held across both experiments despite the likelihood ratio increasing by two orders of magnitude, revealing that people are not sensitive to the value of the likelihood ratio.

KeywordsForensic evidence ; Juror decision-making; Likelihood ratio; Alibi
ANZSRC Field of Research 2020520402. Decision making
480503. Criminal procedure
Public Notes

Files associated with this item cannot be displayed due to copyright restrictions.

Byline AffiliationsUniversity of Queensland
Permalink -

https://research.usq.edu.au/item/yzyq1/does-dna-evidence-in-the-form-of-a-likelihood-ratio-affect-perceivers-sensitivity-to-the-strength-of-a-suspect-s-alibi

  • 23
    total views
  • 0
    total downloads
  • 2
    views this month
  • 0
    downloads this month

Export as

Related outputs

Most states now have affirmative sexual consent laws, but not enough people know what they mean
Crowe, Jonathan and Ribeiro, Gianni. 2024. "Most states now have affirmative sexual consent laws, but not enough people know what they mean." The Conversation.
The impact of misinformation presented during jury deliberation on juror memory and decision-making
Cullen, Hayley J., Dilevski, Natali, Nitschke, Faye T., Ribeiro, Gian, Brind, Shobanah and Woolley, Nikita. 2024. "The impact of misinformation presented during jury deliberation on juror memory and decision-making." Frontiers in Psychology. 15. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2024.1232228
Visual decision aids: Improving laypeople’s understanding of forensic science evidence
Ribeiro, Gianni, Likwornik, Helena and Chin, Jason M.. 2023. "Visual decision aids: Improving laypeople’s understanding of forensic science evidence ." Journal of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition. 12 (2), pp. 230-240. https://doi.org/10.1037/mac0000026
Diagnostic information produces better-calibrated judgments about forensic comparison evidence than likelihood ratios
Ribeiro, Gianni, McKimmie, Blake Malcolm and Tangen, Jason Marcus. 2023. "Diagnostic information produces better-calibrated judgments about forensic comparison evidence than likelihood ratios." Journal of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition. 12 (3), pp. 412-420. https://doi.org/10.1037/mac0000062
A Multi-Site Collaborative Study of the Hostile Priming Effect
McCarthy, Randy, Gervais, Will, Aczel, Balazs, Al-Kire, Rosemary L., Aveyard, Mark, Marcella Baraldo, Silvia, Baruh, Lemi, Basch, Charlotte, Baumert, Anna, Behler, Anna, Bettencourt, Ann, Bitar, Adam, Bouxom, Hugo, Buck, Ashley, Cemalcilar, Zeynep, Chekroun, Peggy, Chen, Jacqueline M., del Fresno-Díaz, Ángel, Ducham, Alec, ..., Zogmaister, C.. 2021. "A Multi-Site Collaborative Study of the Hostile Priming Effect." Collabra: Psychology. 7 (1). https://doi.org/10.1525/collabra.18738
To which world regions does the valence-dominance model of social perception apply?
Jones, Benedict C., DeBruine, Lisa Marie, Flake, Jessica K., Liuzza, Marco Tullio, Antfolk, Jan, Arinze, Nwadiogo C., Ndukaihe, Izuchukwu L. G., Bloxsom, Nicholas G., Lewis, Savannah, Foroni, Francesco, Willis, Megan L., Cubillas, Carmelo P., Vadillo, Miguel A., Turiegano, Enrique, Gilead, Michael, Simchon, Almog, Saribay, S. Adil, Owsley, Nicholas C., Jang, Chaning, ..., Coles, Nicholas A.. 2021. "To which world regions does the valence-dominance model of social perception apply?" Nature Human Behaviour. 5 (1), pp. 159-169. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41562-020-01007-2
Truth and transparency in expertise research
Searston, Rachel A., Thompson, Matthew B., Robson, Samuel G., Corbett, Brooklyn J., Ribeiro, Gianni, Edmond, Gary and Tangen, Jason M.. 2019. "Truth and transparency in expertise research ." Journal of Expertise. 2 (4), pp. 199-209.
Open forensic science
Chin, Jason M, Ribeiro, Gianni and Rairden, Alicia. 2019. "Open forensic science." Journal of Law and the Biosciences. 6 (1), pp. 255-288. https://doi.org/10.1093/jlb/lsz009
Beliefs about error rates and human judgment in forensic science
Ribeiro, Gianni, Tangen, Jason M. and McKimmie, Blake M. 2019. "Beliefs about error rates and human judgment in forensic science." Forensic Science International. 297 (1), pp. 138-147. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.forsciint.2019.01.034
Investigating the impact of jury sentencing recommendations using procedural justice theory
Ribeiro, Gianni and Antrobus, Emma. 2017. "Investigating the impact of jury sentencing recommendations using procedural justice theory." New Criminal Law Review: an international and interdisciplinary journal. 20 (4), pp. 535-568. https://doi.org/10.1525/nclr.2017.20.4.535
Thinking forensics: Cognitive science for forensic practitioners
Edmond, Gary, Towler, Alice, Growns, Bethany, Ribeiro, Gianni, Found, Bryan, White, David, Ballantyne, Kaye, Searston, Rachel A., Thompson, Matthew B., Tangen, Jason M., Kemp, Richard I. and Martire, Kristy. 2017. "Thinking forensics: Cognitive science for forensic practitioners." Science and Justice. 57 (2), pp. 144-154. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scijus.2016.11.005
Model forensic science
Edmond, Gary, Found, Bryan, Martire, Kristy, Ballantyne, Kaye, Hamer, David, Searston, Rachel, Thompson, Matthew, Cunliffe, Emma, Kemp, Richard, San Roque, Mehera, Tangen, Jason, Dioso-Villa, Rachel, Ligertwood, Andrew, Hibbert, David, White, David, Ribeiro, Gianni, Porter, Glenn, Towler, Alice and Roberts, Andrew. 2016. "Model forensic science." Australian Journal of Forensic Sciences. 48 (5), pp. 496-537. https://doi.org/10.1080/00450618.2015.1128969