Plant-soil feedbacks do not explain invasion success of Acacia species in introduced range populations in Australia

Article


Birnbaum, C. and Leishman, M. R.. 2013. "Plant-soil feedbacks do not explain invasion success of Acacia species in introduced range populations in Australia ." Biological Invasions. 15 (12), pp. 2609-2625. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10530-013-0478-z
Article Title

Plant-soil feedbacks do not explain invasion success of Acacia species in introduced range populations in Australia

ERA Journal ID3212
Article CategoryArticle
AuthorsBirnbaum, C. and Leishman, M. R.
Journal TitleBiological Invasions
Journal Citation15 (12), pp. 2609-2625
Number of Pages17
YearDec 2013
PublisherSpringer
Place of PublicationNetherlands
ISSN1387-3547
1573-1464
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1007/s10530-013-0478-z
Web Address (URL)https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10530-013-0478-z
Abstract

Legumes, especially acacias, are considered amongst the most successful invaders globally. However there is still very little known about the role of soil microbial communities in their invasion success in novel ranges. We examined the role of the soil microbial community in the invasion success of four Acacia species (A. cyclops, A. longifolia, A. melanoxylon and A. saligna) and a close relative Paraserianthes lophantha, introduced into novel regions within Australia using a “black-box” approach. Seed and soil material were collected from multiple populations within each species’ native and introduced range within Australia and used in a plant-soil feedback experiment to assess the effect of the soil microbial community on plant growth and nodulation. We found no effect, either positive or negative, of soil origin on species’ performance, however there was a significant interaction between species and seed origin. Seed origin had a significant effect on the biomass of two species, A. cyclops and A. saligna. A. cyclops plants from the native range performed better across all soils than plants from the introduced range. The opposite trend was observed for A. saligna, with plants from the introduced range performing better overall than plants from the native range. Seed or soil origin did not have a significant effect on the presence and number of nodules suggesting that rhizobia do not constrain the invasion success of these legumes. Our results suggest that plant-soil feedbacks are unlikely to have played a significant role in the invasion success of these five species introduced into novel regions within Australia. This may be due to the widespread occurrence of acacias and their associated soil microbial communities throughout the Australian continent.

KeywordsInvasive species; Legumes; Novel ranges; Plant-soil interactions; Rhizobia
ANZSRC Field of Research 2020310308. Terrestrial ecology
310703. Microbial ecology
410202. Biosecurity science and invasive species ecology
Public Notes

Files associated with this item cannot be displayed due to copyright restrictions.

Byline AffiliationsMacquarie University
Permalink -

https://research.usq.edu.au/item/v1z81/plant-soil-feedbacks-do-not-explain-invasion-success-of-acacia-species-in-introduced-range-populations-in-australia

  • 22
    total views
  • 1
    total downloads
  • 0
    views this month
  • 0
    downloads this month

Export as

Related outputs

Global Diversity and Distribution of Rhizosphere and Root-Associated Fungi in Coastal Wetlands: A Systematic Review
Lumibao, Candice Y., Harris, Georgia and Birnbaum, Christina. 2024. "Global Diversity and Distribution of Rhizosphere and Root-Associated Fungi in Coastal Wetlands: A Systematic Review." Estuaries and Coasts. 47 (4), pp. 905-916. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12237-024-01343-w
Integrating soil microbial communities into fundamental ecology, conservation, and restoration: examples from Australia
Birnbaum, Christina, Dearnaley, John, Egidi, Eleonora, Frew, Adam, Hopkins, Anna, Powell, Jeff, Aguilar-Trigueros, Carlos, Liddicoat, Craig, Albornoz, Felipe, Heuck, Meike K., Dadzie, Frederick A., Florence, Luke, Singh, Pankaj, Mansfield, Tomas, Rajapaksha, Kumari, Stewart, Jana, Rallo, Paola, Peddle, Shawn D. and Chiarenza, Giancarlo. 2024. "Integrating soil microbial communities into fundamental ecology, conservation, and restoration: examples from Australia." New Phytologist. 241 (3), pp. 974-981. https://doi.org/10.1111/nph.19440
From invisible to visible: Terrestrial biodiversity assessments and conservation policies must include soil organisms in Australia
Birnbaum, Christina and Dearnaley, John. 2023. "From invisible to visible: Terrestrial biodiversity assessments and conservation policies must include soil organisms in Australia." Science. 381 (6658). https://doi.org/10.1126/science.adg7870
Friends to the rescue: using arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi to future-proof Australian agriculture
Heuck, Meike Katharina, Birnbaum, Christina and Frew, Adam. 2023. "Friends to the rescue: using arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi to future-proof Australian agriculture." Microbiology Australia. 44 (1), pp. 5-8. https://doi.org/10.1071/MA23002
Aiding coastal wetland restoration via the belowground soil microbiome: an overview
Birnbaum, Christina and Trevathan-Tackett, Stacey M.. 2023. "Aiding coastal wetland restoration via the belowground soil microbiome: an overview." Restoration Ecology. 31 (7). https://doi.org/10.1111/rec.13824
Degradation Reduces Microbial Richness and Alters Microbial Functions in an Australian Peatland
Birnbaum, Christina, Wood, Jennifer, Lilleskov, Erik, Lamit, Louis James, Shannon, James, Brewer, Matthew and Grover, Samantha. 2022. "Degradation Reduces Microbial Richness and Alters Microbial Functions in an Australian Peatland." Microbial Ecology: an international journal. 85 (3), pp. 875-891. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00248-022-02071-z
Direct and Indirect Effects of Climate Change in Coastal Wetlands: Will Climate Change Influence Wetlands by Affecting Plant Invasion?
Birnbaum, Christina, Waryszak, Pawel and Farrer, Emily C.. 2021. "Direct and Indirect Effects of Climate Change in Coastal Wetlands: Will Climate Change Influence Wetlands by Affecting Plant Invasion? " Wetlands: the journal of the Society of Wetland Scientists. 41 (5). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13157-021-01456-z
Plant and microbial impacts of an invasive species vary across an environmental gradient
Farrer, Emily C., Birnbaum, Christina, Waryszak, Pawel, Halbrook, Susannah R., Brady, Monica V., Bumby, Caitlin R., Candaele, Helena, Kulick, Nelle K., Lee, Sean F. H., Schroeder, Carolyn S., Smith, McKenzie K. H. and Wilber, William. 2021. "Plant and microbial impacts of an invasive species vary across an environmental gradient ." Journal of Ecology. 109 (5), pp. 2163-2176. https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2745.13629
Phragmites australis Associates with Belowground Fungal Communities Characterized by High Diversity and Pathogen Abundance
Schroeder, Carolyn S., Halbrook, Susannah, Birnbaum, Christina, Waryszak, Pawel, Wilber, William and Farrer, Emily C.. 2020. "Phragmites australis Associates with Belowground Fungal Communities Characterized by High Diversity and Pathogen Abundance ." Diversity. 12 (9). https://doi.org/10.3390/d12090363
Availability of soil mutualists may not limit non-native Acacia invasion but could increase their impact on native soil communities
Wandrag, Elizabeth M., Birnbaum, Christina, Klock, Metha M., Barrett, Luke G. and Thrall, Peter H.. 2020. "Availability of soil mutualists may not limit non-native Acacia invasion but could increase their impact on native soil communities ." Journal of Applied Ecology. 57 (4), pp. 786-793. https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2664.13577
Soil fungal responses to experimental warming and drying in a Mediterranean shrubland
Birnbaum, Christina, Hopkins, Anna J.M., Fontaine, Joseph B. and Enright, Enright. 2019. "Soil fungal responses to experimental warming and drying in a Mediterranean shrubland ." Science of the Total Environment. 683, pp. 524-536. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.05.222
Symbiotic N2-Fixer Community Composition, but Not Diversity, Shifts in Nodules of a Single Host Legume Across a 2-Million-Year Dune Chronosequence
Birnbaum, Christina, Bissett, Andrew, Teste, Francois P. and Laliberte, Etienne. 2018. "Symbiotic N2-Fixer Community Composition, but Not Diversity, Shifts in Nodules of a Single Host Legume Across a 2-Million-Year Dune Chronosequence ." Microbial Ecology: an international journal. 76 (4), pp. 1009-1020. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00248-018-1185-1
Effect of plant root symbionts on performance of native woody species in competition with an invasive grass in multispecies microcosms
Birnbaum, Christina, Morald, Tim K., Tibbett, Mark, Bennett, Richard G. and Standish, Rachel J.. 2018. "Effect of plant root symbionts on performance of native woody species in competition with an invasive grass in multispecies microcosms ." Ecology and Evolution. 8 (17), pp. 8652-8664. https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.4397
Topsoil Stockpiling in Restoration: Impact of Storage Time on Plant Growth and Symbiotic Soil Biota
Birnbaum, Christina, Bradshaw, Laura Elizabeth, Ruthrof, Katinka Xoliswa and Fontaine, Joseph Benjamin. 2017. "Topsoil Stockpiling in Restoration: Impact of Storage Time on Plant Growth and Symbiotic Soil Biota ." Ecological Restoration. 35 (3), pp. 237-245. https://doi.org/10.3368/er.35.3.237
Nitrogen-fixing bacterial communities in invasive legume nodules and associated soils are similar across introduced and native range populations in Australia
Birnbaum, Christina, Bissett, Andrew, Thrall, Peter H. and Leishman, Michelle R.. 2016. "Nitrogen-fixing bacterial communities in invasive legume nodules and associated soils are similar across introduced and native range populations in Australia ." Journal of Biogeography. 43 (8), pp. 1631-1644. https://doi.org/10.1111/jbi.12752
Sequential Disturbance Effects of Hailstorm and Fire on Vegetation in a Mediterranean-Type Ecosystem
Gower, K., Fontaine, J.B., Birnbaum, C. and Enright, N.J.. 2015. "Sequential Disturbance Effects of Hailstorm and Fire on Vegetation in a Mediterranean-Type Ecosystem ." Ecosystems. 18 (7), pp. 1121-1134. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10021-015-9886-5
Regeneration failure threatens persistence of Persoonia elliptica (Proteaceae) in Western Australian jarrah forests
Nield, Andrew P., Monaco, Sophie, Birnbaum, Christina and Enright, Neal J.. 2015. "Regeneration failure threatens persistence of Persoonia elliptica (Proteaceae) in Western Australian jarrah forests ." Plant Ecology. 216 (2), pp. 189-198. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11258-014-0427-7
Invasive legumes encounter similar soil fungal communities in their non-native and native ranges in Australia
Birnbaum, Christina, Bissett, Andrew, Thrall, Peter H. and Leishman, Michelle R.. 2014. "Invasive legumes encounter similar soil fungal communities in their non-native and native ranges in Australia ." Soil Biology and Biochemistry. 76, pp. 210-217. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2014.05.017
Mutualisms are not constraining cross-continental invasion success of Acacia species within Australia
Birnbaum, Christina, Barrett, Luke G., Thrall, Peter H. and Leishman, Michelle R.. 2012. "Mutualisms are not constraining cross-continental invasion success of Acacia species within Australia ." Diversity and Distributions. 18 (10), pp. 962-976. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1472-4642.2012.00920.x